MOST CONFUSING WORDS IN ENGLISH PART 3 - GOVERNMENT JOBS

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

MOST CONFUSING WORDS IN ENGLISH PART 3


Part 3
Lay/Lie
To lay means to put or to place.
Ex: lay your books on the table.
To lie means to recline; to rest.
Ex: Peter will lie down for a nap.
Note: Be careful. The past tense of to lay is laid: Rosy laid out her outfit. The past tense of to lie is lay: Peter lay down for a nap over an hour ago.

Lead/Led
Lead, when it rhymes with “bed,” refers to a type of metal
Rosy wore a lead apron while the dentist X-rayed her teeth.
Led is the past tense of the verb to lead, which means to guide or to be first:
Ex: Peter led the way.
Learned/Learnt
Learned is standard in American English.
Learnt is standard in British English.
Loose/Lose
Loose means not firm or tight (adjective).
Ex: Rahul wore loose dress for the party.
Lose is always a verb. It means to misplace something or to be unvictorious in a game or contest
Ex: Rohan was careful not to lose his ticket.
Principal/Principle
Principal can be a noun or adjective.
As a noun, it refers to the person in charge of a school or organization
Ex: Rohan was called into the principal’s office.
As an adjective, it means most important
Ex: The principal reason for this meeting is to brainstorm ideas.
A principle (always a noun) is a firmly held belief or ideal
Rosy doesn’t like surprise parties as a matter of principle.
Inquiry/Enquiry
Inquiry and enquiry both mean “a request for information.”
Inquiry is the standard American English spelling.
Enquiry is the British spelling.
Stationary/Stationery
Stationary means unmoving
The revolving door remained stationary because Rosy was pushing on it the wrong way.
Stationery refers to letter writing materials and especially to high quality paper
Peter printed his résumé on his best stationery.
Than/Then
Than is used for comparisons
Ex: Rohan runs faster than Rahul.
Then is used to indicate time or sequence
Ex: Rahul scored a century and then relaxed.
Toward/Towards
Toward is standard in American English.
Towards is standard in British English.
Who’s/Whose
Who’s is a contraction of “who is”
Ex: Who’s calling you at this hour?
Whose is a possessive pronoun that means “belonging to [someone]”
Ex: Peter, whose phone hadn’t stopped ringing all morning, barely ate anything for breakfast.

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